CARGC team photo with dark blue overlay

People

Leadership

Faculty Fellows

Postdoctoral Fellows/Scholars

Doctoral Fellows

Board of Advisors

Leadership

Clovis Bergère

Clovis Bergère

Assistant Director for Research

Clovis Bergère is Assistant Director for Research at the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a visual ethnographer whose research examines the politics of youth as they are realized in relation to digital media in Guinea, West Africa. He completed his Ph.D. in Childhood Studies at Rutgers University-Camden in 2017, with a specialization in global youth media. His work has appeared in the International Journal of Communication, African Studies Review, American Anthropologist as well as several edited volumes. In addition to digital media, he has written on street corners as spaces of youth socialization in Guinea.  Prior to moving to the United States in 2011, he worked for seven years as a project manager in Children’s Services in London, UK, where he built over thirty innovative playgrounds and youth centers, focused on natural play and collaborative design.

Marina Krikorian

Marina Krikorian

Project Coordinator

Marina Krikorian is Project Coordinator at the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. She manages CARGC’s public events, serves as Managing Editor of CARGC Press, provides support to fellows and guests, and coordinates the Center’s administration, finances, and external communications. Prior to joining the Annenberg School in 2013, Marina was the Public Affairs Coordinator at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University. She has a BA in Political Science from UC Berkeley and an MA in Arab and Middle Eastern Studies from the American University of Beirut, where her research focused on the relationship between the Armenian diaspora in Lebanon and the Armenian homeland. She is co-editor, with CARGC Director Marwan M. Kraidy, of “The Arab Revolutionary Public Sphere,” a special issue of Communication and the Public. She tweets at @mruthkrik.

 

Faculty Fellows

Ergin Bulut

Ergin Bulut

Fall 2019/Spring 2020

Ergin Bulut researches in the area of political economy of media industries and cultural production, video game studies, media and politics, and critical theory. His work has been published in Media, Culture & Society, Triple C, International Journal of Communication, Critical Studies in Media Communication, Television and New Media, Communication and Critical-Cultural Studies. In 2019-2020 academic year, Bulut will be a visitor researcher at the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton and faculty fellow at Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at UPenn. His book, A Precarious Game: The Illusion of Dream Jobs in the Video Game Industry, will be published in 2020 from Cornell University Press. 

Hatim El-HIbri

Hatim El-HIbri

Fall 2019

Hatim El-Hibri is Assistant Professor of Film and Media at George Mason University. He earned his Ph.D in Media, Culture, and Communication from New York University, and previously was a member of the Media Studies Program at the American University of Beirut. His research and teaching interests are global and Arab media and communication, visual culture studies, media infrastructure, and urban studies. He is currently finalizing his first book titled Visions of Beirut: The Urban Life of Media Infrastructure, which examines the history of how images and imaging processes—from colonial mapping to corporate film to live satellite broadcasts—have been mobilized in attempts to manage and contest the spaces and sociality of the city. His work has appeared in journals such the Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication and the International Journal of Communication.

Annemarie Iddins

Annemarie Iddins

Spring 2020

Annemarie Iddins is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at Fairfield University. Her research is primarily situated within the global media studies subfield of Communication, focusing on transnational media industries and cultural politics in the Maghreb and its diaspora. She is currently working on a book manuscript titled No Concessions: Independent Media and the Reshaping of the Moroccan Public, which aims to provide a model for analyzing media-state relations in contexts that combine strong state influence with neoliberal tendencies. Iddins earned her Ph.D in Communication Studies from the University of Michigan following an M.A. in Mass Communication Research from the University of Minnesota and a B.A. in Journalism and French from the University of St. Thomas (Minn.) Her work has been published in Media, Culture & Society, the International Journal of Communication, and the International Journal of Cultural Studies.

Postdoctoral Fellows/Scholars

Padma Chirumamilla

Padma Chirumamilla

2019 – 2021

Padma Chirumamilla examines how media infrastructures shape and are shaped by everyday cultural life and labor in postcolonial South India and the broader Global South. Her dissertation investigates how the television — both the physical object and the broader media entity — were integrated into the daily rhythms of viewers and media workers in small-town and rural regions in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, through venues like the repair shop and technologies likes the videotape and VCR. Through a combination of ethnographic and textually-based methods, Chirumamilla’s research considers how the materiality of media shapes its absorption into the routines and rhythms of everyday life in the Global South. She is also interested in notions of technological futurity, and how the futuristic allure of digital technologies configures everyday encounters with media infrastructures. Padma is a first-generation postsecondary scholar. She holds a Ph.D. in Information Studies from the University of Michigan.

Jinsook Kim

Jinsook Kim

2020 - 2022

Jinsook Kim earned her Ph.D. in Media Studies from the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin in 2019. Her research interests include digital media, online hate culture, and social and political activism in the context of contemporary South Korea. She is currently working on her first book project, tentatively titled Sticky Activism: Online Misogyny and Feminist Anti-Hate Activism in South Korea. During her CARGC fellowship, she also plans to interrogate the convergence between popular feminism, nationalism, and anti-refugee backlash in Korea. Her work has appeared in the peer-reviewed journals Feminist Media StudiesCommunication, Culture & Critique, and Communication and Sport. She is a recipient of the Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies, a Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship from the Social Science Research Council, a Dissertation Award from the Korean American Communication Association, and of top paper awards at academic conferences including SCMS, ICA, and AEJMC. 

Hana Masri

Hana Masri

2020 - 2022

Hana Masri earned her PhD in rhetoric and language from the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Texas at Austin in 2020. Her work examines matter’s role in rhetorical constructions of migration, citizenship, sovereignty, and settler colonialism in contexts from the U.S.-Mexico borderlands to the Middle East. She is particularly interested in the ways that what gets designated trash can function both to render groups of people as waste or surplus and, at times, challenge such designations. This work emphasizes how waste communicates global discourses of human disposability across geopolitically distinct contexts, while also serving as a creative resource to communities and movements that contest modernity’s hierarchies of human value. Her research on these topics and on feminist studies, queer migrations, environmental racism, and social movements more broadly can be found in QED, Women’s Studies in Communication, and Scholar and Feminist, as well as forthcoming edited volumes on queer migrations and Middle Eastern and North African communication studies. Her research on border “trash” in Arizona and the politics of sewage in Gaza has also received top paper awards from the National Communication Association in 2016 and 2019.

Fernanda R. Rosa

Fernanda R. Rosa

2019 – 2021

Fernanda R. Rosa’s work applies a sociotechnical lens to the study of internet interconnection politics to unveil the social, political and economic aspects that arise from internet infrastructure. Specifically, her work shows how unbalanced relations of power in internet interconnection arrangements challenge values embedded in local indigenous networks. It also addresses how highly privatized dynamics in interconnection facilities known as Internet Exchange Points (IXPs) exacerbate interdependencies between the global North and the global South, and raise human rights questions in contemporary communication. Her research has received awards from American University, Columbia University and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. In 2018, her paper “Internet Infrastructure as a Network of Relations, Devices and Expectations” won one of the Best Student Paper Awards at the TPRC 46 (Research Conference on Communications, Information and Internet Policy). Previously, she co-authored the book Mobile Learning in Brazil (Zinnerama, 2015) on technology and education issues. Fernanda holds a Ph.D. in Communication from American University, in Washington DC, a Masters in Management and Public Policy from Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), and a BA in Social Sciences from the University of São Paulo (USP).

Revati Prasad

Revati Prasad

Postdoctoral Scholar

Revati Prasad studies the politics of technology and information access through a focus on infrastructure, policy and journalism.  Her research has been published in Media, Culture & Society, Communication, Culture and Critique, Journalism and Media Theory and has received awards from the Global Communication and Social Change and the Media Industries Divisions of the International Communication Association. In 2018, Revati also won the James D. Woods Award for outstanding graduate teaching assistant. Revati has an MPA from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, and a BA in Political Science and a BS in Journalism from Ohio University.

Doctoral Fellows

Lauren Bridges

Lauren Bridges

Lauren Bridges is a PhD student at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on material and discursive constructions of digital infrastructure and how these infrastructures work to facilitate or mitigate social, economic, and cultural inequalities. She has written about feminized and precarious labor in the publishing industry, published in New Media & Society, and has presented on the data industries, digital labor, and digital infrastructure at a number of international conferences. She received a master’s degree in creative writing, publishing & editing from the University of Melbourne and a bachelor’s degree in business from Queensland University of Technology. 

Yasemin Y. Celikkol

Yasemin Y. Celikkol

Yasemin Y. Celikkol’s transdisciplinary and comparative global communication research is at the nexus of transnational media, geopolitics, and gender. Her current research investigates Bulgarian and Russian public discourse and media text reactions to the unprecedented popularity of Turkish dramas. She also studies food and clothing as global communication. Celikkol pursued her education in Bulgaria, Japan, and the US. She holds a Politics BA from New York University, a Sociolinguistics MA from International Christian University in Tokyo, an Intercultural Communication MS from the Graduate School for Education of University of Pennsylvania, and a Communication MA from the Annenberg School for Communication. 

Zane Griffin Talley Cooper

Zane Griffin Talley Cooper

Zane Griffin Talley Cooper is a doctoral candidate at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and a doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Research on Global Communication (CARGC), where he researches the cultural and ecological politics of digital infrastructures, and how they intersect with regimes of energy production and resource extraction. He is currently focusing on the material and logistical spaces of blockchain infrastructure, and how these spaces are influenced by resource politics – especially rare earth mineral mining. He is also a filmmaker, currently exploring virtual reality as a method for analyzing and communicating complex infrastructural entanglements.

Kinjal Dave

Kinjal Dave

Kinjal Dave is a doctoral student at the Annenberg School for Communication interested in race, rhetoric, technology, activism, journalism, and Critical Theory. Her current work explores the technological and cultural history of stereotypes. As a Research Fellow for the Center for Media at Risk, her work examines how diasporic news deserts shape discourses around the occupation of Kashmir. Prior to attending the University of Pennsylvania, Dave worked as a Research Analyst at Data & Society Research Institute on the Media Manipulation and Disinformation Initiative. There, she used archival materials to understand how the white mainstream press has historically amplified or undermined white supremacists and their ideologies. Dave received her bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Political Science at Villanova University. Her undergraduate thesis explored epistemologies of racial ignorance. 

Heather Jaber

Heather Jaber

Heather Jaber is a doctoral student at the Annenberg School for Communication and a doctoral fellow at the Center for Advanced Research for Global Communication. In her work, she analyzes moral panics around the body in the Arab world, turning to cultural production as a way to understand the panic as a pleasurable form of knowledge production. She draws on theories of affect and affordances, as well as religious studies, to understand the infrastructures of pleasure and shame which undergird these phenomena. Prior to joining Annenberg, she worked as a journalist and researcher in Beirut. 

Florence Madenga

Florence Madenga

Florence Madenga studies journalistic practice broadly and comparatively construe –  how certain existing journalistic models and paradigms fall short in different cultural and global contexts. She is particularly interested in the roles journalists play in or beside state-sponsored media, how they challenge or are affected by censorship laws and “nation-building” tools employed by governments, and journalists in diasporic communities and social media. Prior to CARGC, Madenga worked as a freelance writer both from the United States and internationally. She holds a B.A. in journalism and political science, and an interdisciplinary M.A. from New York University. 

Mariela Morales

Mariela Morales

Before joining Annenberg’s doctoral program and CARGC, Mariela Morales was a Research Analyst at the Lenfest Institute for Journalism. She graduated in 2017 from University of Pennsylvania, with a major in Global Communication. Before graduation, she completed an undergraduate honors thesis about emergent voices in Cuba’s new media landscape. Her research interests are, the politicization of information sources and popular culture in Latin American and Caribbean contexts; the transculturalist tendencies of popular culture production and reproduction between Cuban migrant communities and residents on the island; and comparative studies around issues of digital sovereignties and affordances in socialist, post-communist, and authoritarian nations. 

María Celeste Wagner

María Celeste Wagner

María Celeste Wagner is a Ph.D. candidate at the Annenberg School. From a mixed-methods and comparative approach, Celeste studies the influence of the media on attitudes around issues of identity, particularly gender; how individuals emotionally relate to the media; and how they construct meaning and develop practices around them. She is a doctoral fellow at CARGC and a research affiliate at MESO Argentina, the Center for Media and Society in Argentina, her home country. Her work has been published in Latin American Perspectives, Media, Culture & Society, Digital Journalism, Journalism and Latin American peer-reviewed journals, such as Cuadernos.info and Palabra Clave.

Founding Director

Marwan M. Kraidy

Marwan M. Kraidy

Founding director Marwan M. Kraidy is a scholar of global communication and an authority on Arab media, politics, and culture. He studies the relationship between culture and geopolitics, theories of identity and modernity, and global media systems and industries. Kraidy is currently Dean and CEO of Northwestern University in Qatar, and the Anthony Shadid Chair in Global Media, Politics and Culture at Northwestern University in Evanston.

Prior to his appointment at Northwestern, he was Associate Dean for Administration, Professor of Communication, and Anthony Shadid Chair in Global Media, Politics and Culture at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, where he was on the faculty from 2007 to 2020.

Kraidy founded the Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication in 2013, and expanded it into the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) in 2016. Following decades of dedicated scholarship, mentoring, and teaching in global communication, Kraidy founded CARGC as an institute for advanced study focused on the development of doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers, and early career professors in global communication. He has mentored generations of CARGC Fellows, and several remain his doctoral advisees.

Kraidy is a prolific scholar with 13 published books and edited volumes and 130 essays and chapters. His teaching and scholarship are recognized globally with more than 50 awards.

Among Kraidy’s notable books are Hybridity, or the Cultural Logic of Globalization (Temple University Press, 2005), Reality Television and Arab Politics: Contention in Public Life (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and The Naked Blogger of Cairo: Creative Insurgency in the Arab World (Harvard University Press, 2016).

In 2017, Kraidy became the only scholar to have twice won the Best Book Award from the International Communication Association’s Division of Global Communication and Social Change, first in 2011 for Reality Television and Arab Politics, and again in 2017 for The Naked Blogger of Cairo. Also in 2017, Kraidy became the first author to win the Roderick P. Hart Outstanding Book Award in Political Communication two times, in 2011 and 2017, for the same two books.

The recipient of fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Kraidy was the first communication scholar to be awarded the prestigious Andrew Carnegie Fellowship by the Carnegie Corporation in New York, in 2016.

Currently serving on the Board of Directors of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) in New York, and on the International Advisory Board of the Center for American Studies and Research (CASAR) at the American University of Beirut, Kraidy serves on the CARGC Board of Advisors. He previously served on the Advisory Board of the Center for Democracy and Election Management at American University, Washington DC, and on the International Advisory Board of the National Museum of Qatar.

Fluent in Arabic and French, and conversant in Spanish, Kraidy is a regular media contributor worldwide and tweets @MKraidy.

Board of Advisors

Michael X. Delli Carpini, Chair

(Oscar Gandy Jr Professor of Communication, Annenberg School for Communication)

Aswin Punathambekar

(Associate Professor, University of Virginia)

Yasemin Celikkol

(CARGC Doctoral Fellow and Annenberg PhD student)

Hatim El-Hibri

(Assistant Professor, George Mason University)

Heather Jaber

(CARGC Doctoral Fellow and Annenberg PhD student)

Marwan M. Kraidy

(Dean and CEO, Northwestern University in Qatar)

Mariela Morales

(CARGC Doctoral Fellow and Annenberg PhD student)

Patrick D. Murphy

(Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, Klein College of Media and Communication, Temple University)

Rahul Mukherjee

(Associate Professor of English, Penn)

Maria Repnikova

(Assistant Professor, Georgia State University)

Mimi Sheller

(Professor and Director of Center for Mobility Studies, Drexel University)

Celeste Wagner

(CARGC Doctoral Fellow and Annenberg PhD student)

Karin G. Wilkins

(Dean, School of Communication, Miami University)

Bilge Yesil

(Associate Professor, City University of New York)